; Configuration file for smbd.
; ============================================================================
; For the format of this file and comprehensive descriptions of all the
; configuration option, please refer to the man page for smb.conf(5).
;
; The following configuration should suit most systems for basic usage and 
; initial testing. It gives all clients access to their home directories and
; allows access to all printers specified in /etc/printcap.
;
; Things you need to check:
; --------------------------
;
; 1: Check the path to your printcap file. If you are using a system that does 
;    not use printcap (eg., Solaris), create a file containing lines of the 
;    form
;
;       printername|printername|printername|
;
;    where each "printername" is the name of a printer you want to provide 
;    access to. Then alter the "printcap =" entry to point to the new file.
;
;    If using Solaris, the following command will generate a suitable printcap
;    file:
;
;       lpc status | grep ":" | sed s/:/\|/ > myprintcap
;
; 2: Make sure the "print command" entry is correct for your system. This 
;    command should submit a file (represented by %s) to a printer 
;    (represented by %p) for printing and should REMOVE the file after 
;    printing.
;  
;    One most systems the default will be OK, as long as you get "printing ="
;    right.
;    
;    It is also a good idea to use an absolute path in the print command
;    as there is no guarantee the search path will be set correctly.
;
; 3: Make sure the "printing =" option is set correctly for your system.
;    Possible values are "sysv", "bsd" or "aix".
;
; 4: Make sure the "lpq command" entry is correct for your system. The default
;    may not work for you.
;
; 5: Make sure that the user specified in "guest account" exists. Typically
;    this will be a user that cannot log in and has minimal privileges.
;    Often the "nobody" account doesn't work (very system dependant).
;
; 6: You should consider the "security =" option. See a full description
;    in the main documentation and the smb.conf(5) manual page
;
; 7: Look at the "hosts allow" option, unless you want everyone on the internet
;    to be able to access your files.
;
[global]
   printing = bsd
   printcap name = /etc/printcap
   load printers = yes
   guest account = gast_smb
   workgroup = WORKGROUP
;  This next option sets a separate log file for each client. Remove
;  it if you want a combined log file.
   log file = /usr/lib/samba/log.%m

;  You will need a world readable lock directory and "share modes=yes"
;  if you want to support the file sharing modes for multiple users
;  of the same files
;  lock directory = /usr/local/samba/var/locks
;  share modes = yes


; Das folgende ist eine sehr interessante Möglichkeit, wie User, die sich
; unter Windows95 mit einem Namen einloggen, den sie auch unter Unix
; als Lognamen haben, auf ihr jeweiliges Home-Verzeichnis zugreifen können.

[homes]
   comment = Home Directories
   browseable = no
   read only = no
   create mode = 0750


; Die Freigabe der Drucker

[printers]
   comment = All Printers
   browseable = no
   printable = yes
   public = yes
   writable = no
   create mode = 0700



; you might also want this one
; [tmp]
;   comment = Temporary file space
;   path = /tmp
;   read only = no
;   public = yes


;
; Other examples. 
;
; A private printer, usable only by fred. Spool data will be placed in fred's
; home directory. Note that fred must have write access to the spool directory,
; wherever it is.
;[fredsprn]
;   comment = Fred's Printer
;   valid users = fred
;   path = /homes/fred
;   printer = freds_printer
;   public = no
;   writable = no
;   printable = yes
;
; A private directory, usable only by fred. Note that fred requires write
; access to the directory.
;[fredsdir]
;   comment = Fred's Service
;   path = /usr/somewhere/private
;   valid users = fred
;   public = no
;   writable = yes
;   printable = no
;
; A publicly accessible directory, but read only, except for people in
; the staff group
;[public]
;   comment = Public Stuff
;   path = /usr2/public
;   public = yes
;   writable = yes
;   printable = no
;   write list = @staff
;
; a service which has a different directory for each machine that connects
; this allows you to tailor configurations to incoming machines. You could
; also use the %u option to tailor it by user name.
; The %m gets replaced with the machine name that is connecting.
;[pchome]
;  comment = PC Directories
;  path = /usr/pc/%m
;  public = no
;  writeable = yes
;
;
; A publicly accessible directory, read/write to all users. Note that all files
; created in the directory by users will be owned by the default user, so
; any user with access can delete any other user's files. Obviously this
; directory must be writable by the default user. Another user could of course
; be specified, in which case all files would be owned by that user instead.
[public]
   path = /usr/public
   public = yes
   only guest = yes
   writable = yes
   printable = no
;
[CDROM]
   path = /cdrom
   public = yes
   only guest = yes
   writable = no
   printable = no

;
;
; The following two entries demonstrate how to share a directory so that two
; users can place files there that will be owned by the specific users. In this
; setup, the directory should be writable by both users and should have the
; sticky bit set on it to prevent abuse. Obviously this could be extended to
; as many users as required.
;[myshare]
;   comment = Mary's and Fred's stuff
;   path = /usr/somewhere/shared
;   valid users = mary fred
;   public = no
;   writable = yes
;   printable = no
;   create mask = 0765